The High Cost of Musculoskeletal Disorders – And How to Lessen Them

A single workplace musculoskeletal injury can cost a company between $18,000 and $60,000, according to Mike Kim, CTO and co-founder of StrongArm Technologies, a safety data solution provider.

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) affect muscles, tendons, blood vessels, nerves, ligaments, discs, etc. Aside from the compensation costs paid to injured workers, a company can also incur indirect costs, including lost productivity, the cost of replacing affected employees, and the price tag that comes with training their replacements.

“Because of these indirect factors, OSHA believes the cost might be doubled,” said Kim, speaking during a recent Intelex EHSQ community webinar. “Then we’re looking at $36,000 to $120,000 for one injury. And that’s not to mention the personal toll it takes on the workers and their families, and their livelihood.”

To help prevent MSDs, it’s important to know what causes them. The main factor, according to the 2017 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Read more...

The Power of IT and EHS – It’s only the beginning

The innovative power of information technology (IT) will turn the EHS industry on its ear!

It’s still somewhat early days for the integration of IT and EHS workflow process, and the road being travelled by many organizations is to simply take the first step of moving beyond traditional methods of paper-based recording and tracking, and replacing these with electronic processes. But the way forward for businesses is a path to huge transformation.

As the saying goes – “you ain’t seen nothing yet!” So much more is looming.

Technology and innovation in EHS will be the topic of what should be a lively discussion during a forward-looking session at this week’s NAEM EHS Sustainability and Management Forum in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. on the topic of – Drones, Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things: Leveraging Technology to Advance EHS. I’ll facilitate a discussion on the exciting potential and possibilities with … Read more...

OSHA’s New Rule a Recordkeeping Mountain for Employers to Climb

DOWNLOAD NOW ButtonAn already vast ocean of incident and illness electronic recordkeeping for American business has become a whole lot deeper and wider, as a result of OSHA’s “new rule” that came into effect this year.

In 2017, more organizations must gather more data and provide more reporting of accident and illness incidents to the U.S. Department of Labor agency.  The so-called “new rule” from OSHA will turn a molehill into a mountain as the number of those employers who will be expected to report this data is set to quadruple. Currently about 35,000 large employers submit data annually to OSHA and that number is expected to jump to 130,000. Approximately 150,000 smaller employers who currently submit summary data now includes 500,000 organizations.

Other significant requirements of the new rule include:

  • Directing employers to conduct refresher training on recordkeeping requirements.
  • The auditing of injury and illness recordkeeping forms.
  • Providing training on new
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Measuring Safety Part 3 – Serious Injury Prevention – S is for Subjective

Serious Injury Fatality

Serious Injury Prevention – S is for Subjective

In Measuring Safety Part, 1 we reviewed the drawbacks of focusing solely on the measurement of safety outcomes absent understanding and tracking operational processes and events that are predictive of a safe workplace. In Part 2 of the series, we dove deeper into the implications of this thinking by reviewing “Serious Injury Fatality” (SIF). In this Part 3, we look at the subjective nature of serious injury and fatality prevention recording and whether SIF is indeed the better approach to take.

Building a SIF Safety Triangle addresses previous serious safety prevention framework shortcomings, but it also introduces new issues. Our next question: Who decides upon the categorization of processes and events that have the potential for serious injury and fatality? Also, how is this categorization done?

It seems to be relatively easy to define some categories that separate SIF from the non-SIF … Read more...

EHSQ Community | Managing Health and Safety

This month our member Kamran Akhavan Attari shares a post about Safety within Critical Discourse Perspectives, a while members Chris J Ward and Jane Standerwick discusses why organizations fail to manage H&S. We invite you to join our Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality professional community, and share your knowledge with other members.

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Measuring Safety Part 2 – Serious Injury Fatality – Rethinking Measurement and Prevention

workers

In Measuring Safety Part 1, we reviewed the drawbacks of focusing solely on the measurement of safety outcomes absent understanding and tracking operational processes and events that are predictive of a safe workplace. In Part 2 of the series, we are going to dive deeper into the implications of this thinking by reviewing “Serious Injury Fatality” (SIF).

Serious Injury Fatality (SIF) – Breaking it down

The concept is not new. Workplace fatalities have been the object of preventive corporate policies and regulatory scrutiny for decades. Before my interview with Todd Conklin during Pre-accident podcast, however, I had only seen the abbreviation of “SIF” online.

Being an avid reader and learner, I began my Google search on the SIF-phenomenon which revealed many sources on the topic: White papers, several documents by Fred Manuele, and a YouTube video for learning on the subject. Though my search was not an … Read more...

Learnings from Safety Professionals: Old and New Views

Learnings from Safety Professionals

March, 2017, our EHSQ Community had a Mastermind session with Carsten Busch and Rosa Antonia Carrillo, hosted by Tamara Parris, to discuss the Modern and Traditional Safety Management styles, and the challenges EHS Professionals face with each.

During our sessions we had just over 142 community members share their views in our Members voice survey. During the session, we had several members voiced their challenges and insights learned through their own work experiences.

From our “Member’s Voice” discussion we learned 78% of our members use an Empowering Leadership style in their workplace for safety management, and 43% use the Taylorism /Traditional approach. Rosa shared she was not surprised because when working with Safety Professionals they understand empowerment is the only way to motivate people and get buy-in. Carsten shared that because he works in the Police Organization, the institution is hierarchical. Whereas, his department leader uses a Servant style with Read more...

EHSQ Community | Crisis Planning

This month our member Richard Rosera shares a post about the Chemical Safety Board, while member Vince Marchesani volunteers to host a Mastermind discussion to review Crisis Management Planning.  We invite you to join our Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality professional community, and share your knowledge with other members.

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Measuring Safety, part 1 – The Relevance of Outcomes

The other day I received another self-praising message in my news-feed, one of Norway’s major construction contractors was celebrating their one year anniversary since their last lost time injury incident, making their LTIF now “Zero”.

While reading James Reason’s latest book, “Organisational Accidents Revisited” I noticed the quote: “The road to Hell is paved with falling LTI frequency rates”,  illustrated by major cases like DWH and Texas City.

I believe it is good when no one has been injured as a consequence of their work. At the same time, this has again turned my attention to something which has been keeping me busy for many years;

why are people so focused on outcomes, when they mean so little in terms of improvement, especially in safety?

 Obsessed About Outcomes

When an incident or accident happens, it’s generally the consequences that attract great attention. From a humanitarian and … Read more...

EHSQ Community | Safety Management

This month our member Sonal Phualmbrikar shares a post about the Automotive Aftermarket, while members Carsten Busch and Rosa Antonia Carrillo volunteer to host an open discussion about the shift from Traditional to Modern safety management styles in the EHS field.  We invite you to join our Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality professional community, and share your knowledge with other members.

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