6 Tips to Help Avoid Workplace Injuries

If you want to decrease workplace injuries, ensure everyone has the proper safety training relating to the hazards of the job.

Accidents are unplanned occurrences that result in injuries, illness, death and loss of property and/or production. By managing risk and implementing a safety management system, injuries, illnesses and workplace incidents can be reduced and even eliminated.

  1. Know the Hazards
  • Be aware of surroundings.  Look around and identify workplace hazards that could cause harm.
  • Implement strategies to reduce or eliminate hazards.
  • Report unsafe areas or practices.
  • Dress for the weather.
  • Use the EHS job hazard analysis tools to identify hazards associated with job types.

2. Create a Safe Work Area

  • Keep an orderly workplace.  Poor housekeeping can cause serious health and safety hazards. The layout of the workplace should have adequate egress routes and be free of debris. 
  • Inspect vehicles before and after use. DRIVE SAFELY.
  • Continually cultivate a
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10 Tips to Prevent Workplace Injuries

Each day, millions of workers head to manufacturing facilities, oil and gas refineries, mines, shipyards, airlines, food distribution hubs, farms, stores and more. Thousands of workers won’t return home from work.

Over 1 million work-related deaths occur annually, according to estimates from the International Labour Organisation and hundreds of millions of workers suffer from workplace injuries and occupational exposure to hazardous substances worldwide.

These fatal injuries and illnesses are emotionally and financially devastating for the workers and their families. For employers, the loss of an employee in a workplace incident results in the loss of a coworker and friend, in many cases, as well as possible citations and fines for violations of workplace safety and health standards, the cost of medical bills, lost productivity, workers’ compensation insurance increases and low morale among the workforce.

The best way to avoid these disruptions and costs is to eliminate workplace hazards. Read our … Read more...

The Top 7 Tips to Fight Workplace Fatigue

While there is no one solution to fit everyone’s needs, here are some general strategies that workers and employers can use to manage workplace fatigue and work safely.

Long work hours and irregular work shifts are common in our society. Many workers around the world spend over 40 hours a week at work and hundreds of millions of people work full time on evening, night, rotating or other irregular shifts. Work schedules like these may cause workplace fatigue.

Shift workers may be scheduled to work days, evenings, nights and/or on a rotating or on-call basis. They may work extended shifts (more than 8 hours long), rotating or irregular shifts or consecutive shifts resulting in far more hours than what is considered a typical 40-hour work week. Long work hours and the fatigue associated with them can increase the risk of injuries and accidents and can contribute to poor overall health. … Read more...

The 10 Signs of Worker Fatigue

Worker fatigue increases the risk for injury and deteriorating health (infections, illnesses and mental health disorders).

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has touched all aspects of society, including how we work and it is leaving many of us suffereing from or battling worker fatigue in the workplace. Emergency responders, health care workers, manufacturing workers, supply chain workers and others providing essential services to the community have been especially stretched thin, working longer hours than usual, working more shifts or even over-night and leaving less time to sleep and recharge.

Under regular circumstances, adults need 7–9 hours of sleep per night, along with opportunities for rest while awake to ensure optimal health and well-being. Long work hours and shift work, combined with stressful or physically demanding work or a change in work routines, can lead to poor sleep and extreme fatigue. Fatigue increases the risk for injury and deteriorating health (infections, illnesses and … Read more...

The 5 Basic Principles of HOP (Human and Organizational Performance)


Conversation is imperative for HOP and most critical to success. Active listening and learning (worker-to-worker and worker-to-management) is necessary to understand where failure and loss is possible.

Human and Organizational Performance systems, better known as HOP, have garnered much recent discussion and interest by many organizations, who see it as a better approach to improving safety performance. The premise of HOP is the idea that human error is inevitable so perhaps through better process systems management and analysis, organizations might lessen the effect of human error through the promotion of defenses that reduce risk.  

It is with this thinking that organizations can build management system robustness by understanding how workers perform their daily work tasks and then understanding what the gaps or errors are within the management system and close the gaps through what is commonly referred to as defenses. 

Conversation is imperative for HOP and most critical to success. Active listening and learning (worker-to-worker and worker-to-management) is necessary to understand where failure and loss is possible. It requires looking back at past events where loss was experienced, reviewing the present where errors are armed and ready to strike, and it’s an eye into the future to identify certain job tasks that promote the chance … Read more...

142 Workers Were Killed at Work in Great Britain in 2020/21

Provisional data released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) shows that a total of 142 workers were killed at work in Great Britain in 2020/21, an increase of 29 from the previous year, though the number of deaths in 2019/20 (113) was low compared to recent years.

In statistical terms, the number of fatalities has remained broadly level in recent years – the average annual number of workers killed at work over the five years 2016/17-2020/21 is 136. The fatality numbers released by HSE relate to workplace incidents. They do not include deaths arising from occupational exposure to disease, including Covid-19.

Over the past 20 years there has been a long-term reduction in the number of workplace fatalities, demonstrating that Great Britain is one of the safest places to work in the world.

“Whilst the working world in which we now live has created new health challenges for workers … Read more...

Mining Pain Points and Solutions: How Technology Makes the Difference

Approximately 230,000 miners work across 11,500 metal/nonmetal mines in the U.S., while 64,000 work in the nation’s 1,000 coal mines. The mining sector employs 3.7 million+ workers worldwide.

In 2020, mining-related deaths declined and the mining industry achieved its highest compliance with U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration health standards, which protect the long-term health and safety of miners. The year 2020 saw all-time-low average concentrations of respirable dust and respirable quartz in underground coal mines, as well as exposure to dust and quartz for miners at highest risk of overexposure to respirable dust.

That said, the agency issued thousands of citations in 2020 for violations of the Mine Safety and Health Act, and the fines for all of those citations add up to millions of dollars. And despite the good news of fewer fatal injuries and fewer citations, miners continue to die and be seriously injured at work.

Our … Read more...

Data Quality – It’s a Dirty Job, but Someone’s Got To Do It

Data quality is the foundation for EHS insights.
Forty-seven percent of newly-created data records have at least one critical (e.g., work-impacting) error.

Data quality is the foundation that EHS insights are built upon. When EHS data suffers from poor data quality, insights are eroded and the information that was once on a stable foundation is no longer suitable for analytics.

Many companies starting their data analytics journey make the mistake of skipping the data cleaning process all together. None of us want to see how the sausage is made, we just want the bratwurst to magically appear. But as we have seen over and over, insightful analytics cannot be achieved with poor data quality.

Only 3% of Data Meets Quality Standards

A 2017 Harvard Business Review article, “Only 3% of Companies’ Data Meets Basic Quality Standards,” outlined the data quality crisis best, stating that, “Forty-seven percent of newly-created data records have at least one critical (e.g., work-impacting) error.”… Read more...

OSHA Issues Emergency Temporary Standard to Protect Healthcare Workers from COVID-19

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced on June 10 it will issue an emergency temporary standard (ETS) to protect healthcare workers from contracting coronavirus. The standard focuses on healthcare workers most likely to have contact with someone infected with the virus.

In addition to the healthcare-focused ETS, OSHA is issuing updated guidance to help employers and workers in other industries protect workers who are still not vaccinated, with a special emphasis on other industries noted for prolonged close-contacts like meat processing, manufacturing, seafood and grocery and high-volume retail. The agency also issued a new general industry guidance, and both the guidance and the ETS are aligned with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Too many of our frontline healthcare workers continue to be at high risk of contracting the coronavirus,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh. “As I said when … Read more...

FY 2022 U.S. Federal Budget Includes $140 Million Additional Funding for MSHA and OSHA Budgets

U.S. President Joe Biden has proposed key investments to strengthen the unemployment insurance system, expand pathways to good-paying jobs, safeguard workers’ health through increases in the MSHA and OSHA budgets and create greater financial security for workers.

The Biden-Harris administration submitted the president’s budget for Fiscal Year 2022 to Congress.

“The president’s budget renews the Department of Labor’s commitment to help America’s workers, particularly those from disadvantaged communities, find pathways to high-quality, good-paying jobs,” said Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh. “The president’s initiatives also restore the department’s capacity to protect the health, safety, rights and financial security of all workers. Additionally, the American Jobs Plan’s investments further enhance the department’s ability to meet its mission by creating pathways to millions of high-quality jobs and rebuilding our country’s infrastructure.”

The budget includes the two historic plans the president has already put forward – the American Jobs Plan and the American Families … Read more...