Curtailing Construction’s Fatal Four – Eliminating Injuries from Electricity

Power_Lines_2The “Fatal Four” of construction are falls, electrocutions, workers being caught in or between objects, and worker being struck by objects. In the United States, these hazards consistently account for over 50% of construction worker deaths annually. This translates into the deaths of over 899 workers on a yearly basis. In our four part blog post series, we will examine each hazard and highlight the steps companies are taking to not only ensure compliance with workplace legislation but create a proactive, performance-driven culture to transform their organization.

Electrocutions are the Enemy

“Electrocution” means to kill with electricity and is the result of a human being exposed to lethal amounts of electrical energy. Electrocutions kill 74 construction workers every year.

Electrocutions are the worst form of workplace electrical hazards. The group of hazards can be identified by the acronym “BE SAFE” and include:

B-Burns: The most common shock related injury

E-Electrocution:Read more...

Intelex Community | Quality

Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality Professional CommunityWe invite you to join our Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality professional discussions. This week Community Member  shares her post about using technology to track and monitor construction workers health and safety, we invite you to join the discussion and share your knowledge with our member.

  • Using technology to track and monitor construction workers health and safety

  • ISO 9001:2015: An Implementation Perspective Webinar with Peter-Elias Alouche
  • Best Practice Webinar: SDS Management and System Integration Event

  • Competitive Passenger Rail Service Pilot Program – Proposed

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3 Ways It Pays to Turn Suppliers Into Partners

Supply ChainHave you ever stopped to think about how important your suppliers are to your business? Do you view suppliers as business partners and an extension of your business, or do you see them as a reactive service provider that exists to fulfill demand?

All too often we tend to treat supplier relationships as contractual agreements rather than mutually beneficial partnerships. This behavior grossly under-estimates the tremendous benefit suppliers can provide to your firm’s day-to-day operations.  This “servant” paradigm is not the right way to go about conducting business with suppliers for a number of reasons.  Instead, let’s talk about three key reasons why we need a fundamental shift in our thinking away from the supplier “servant” paradigm to suppliers being members of a critical department in your organization – a key business function that adds value for your customers on a daily basis.

Reason # 1: Start with Trust

Relationships … Read more...

What You Need to Know About the Latest Updates to ISO 45001

Guest Blog

Following publication of the ISO 45001 Occupational Health and Safety Management, Draft International Standard (DIS) in February 2016, the International Committee met in Toronto in June 2016 to discuss over 3,000 comments which had been submitted. A ballot had been held which narrowly failed to support the current DIS.  It was agreed to produce a second DIS, expected in January 2017. If the following ballot is successful the final standard will be published in June 2017.  Meanwhile the first DIS has been withdrawn leaving those who did not see or obtain a copy wondering what need to know in order to prepare themselves for the advent of the Standard.

So what are the problems with the new DIS?  The discussions centered around changes needed to some key ‘Terms and Definitions’ such as ‘worker’, ‘participation’, and the definition of hazard. Changes were also proposed to areas such as ‘participation and consultation’, … Read more...

Intelex Community | Psychological Safety

Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality Professional CommunityWe invite you to join our Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality professional discussions. This week Community Member Peter-Elias Alouche share in his post Importance of Psychological Safety in the Workplace & Teams @ Google, we invite you to join the discussion and share your knowledge with our member.

  • Importance of Psychological Safety in the Workplace & Teams @ Google

  • Workplace Fairness and Psychological Safety Impacts on Safety Culture webinar
  • National Food Safety Education Month

  • Public Transportation Safety Program – Rule

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Curtailing Construction’s Fatal Four – What you need to know about falls from height

Construction Safety gear

The “Fatal Four” of construction are falls, electrocutions, workers being caught in or between objects, and worker being struck by objects. In the United States, these hazards consistently account for over 50% of construction worker deaths annually. This translates into the deaths of over 899 workers on a yearly basis. In our four part blog post series, we will examine each hazard and highlight the steps companies are taking to not only ensure compliance with workplace legislation but create a proactive, performance-driven culture to transform their organization.

Falls Are the Deadliest of All

Of the Fatal Four, falls are the most deadly, accounting for 36% of all construction-related deaths in the United States. In 2014, falls from heights killed 39 people in Britain, making falls responsible for three out of every ten worker fatalities. In Canada, over 42,000 people are injured from falls every year, accounting for 17% of workplace-related … Read more...

Sustainability Trends from NAEM: Zero Waste, Water Efficiency, and More

Beverage_Line

Sustainability conferences give attendees a valuable opportunity to learn about industry trends directly from the companies that are leading the way! It’s safe to say that attendees learned a lot last week in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the 2016 NAEM Sustainability Management Conference. From benchmarking best practices, to real-world case studies, to suggestions on how to engage with suppliers on common goals, this year’s line-up of speakers didn’t disappoint!

For those of you who missed out, or those who attended but would like a refresher, we’ve compiled our key takeaways from three of the most interesting topics of conversation at the conference.

The Zero Waste Journey

While some safety professionals share a “zero injuries” goal, sustainability professionals are talking more and more about a journey towards “zero waste” or “zero landfill.” The ultimate goal is to imitate sustainable cycles in nature, so that all resources involved in the creation of … Read more...

Intelex Community |ISO

Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality Professional CommunityWe invite you to join our Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality professional discussions. This week Community Member Peter-Elias Alouche share in his post ISO 14001:2015: Risk Based Approach, we invite you to join the discussion and share your knowledge with our member.

  • ISO 14001:2015: Risk Based Approach

  • Environmental Toxins and Human Health
  • Join Member Vince Marchesani  in his Leading and Transformational Indicators in EHS&Q Discussion group; and

  • Air Quality State Implementation Plans; Approvals and Promulgations: – Rule

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Sustainable Performance Isn’t About Preventing All Accidents; It’s About Managing the Ability to Adapt and Learn

AmbulanceWith an increasing awareness of the importance of safety, we are seeing a growing trend of zero accident goals. Inherently, this is a laudable moral goal and if we truly value people in organizations, then our intentions should indeed point to a goal of not harming people during operational work. Protecting people is a good thing, but one of the problems with “zero goals” is the lack of acknowledgement about how complexity makes it impossible to predict and prevent all risk in an organization.

 Acceptable Risk and Safety Margins

Two of the principles of US Marine Corps Risk Management are to “Accept No Unnecessary Risk” and to “Make Risk Decisions at the Right Level.” Although predicting all risk is impossible, risk-based approaches are preferable to chasing “zero goals” based on lagging indicators because they explicitly acknowledge the existence of risk during planning and operational execution.

Zero harm is a worthy … Read more...

Creating a Business Case for a Safe and Healthy Workplace

Construction 2

In considering a “Business Case” for creating a psychologically safe and healthy workplace, we need to move beyond the idea that companies have a moral responsibility to send workers home from work as healthy as they were when they arrived.

During my learning for this post I increased my knowledge about psychological illnesses, such as anxiety and depression, and how they are increasingly more prevalent in our workplaces. As EHSQ Community member Ann Morgan discussed in one of our EHSQ Intelex Community webinars on Psychological Safety there is a variety of costs associated with poor psychological health, and businesses are becoming wiser about them.

I learned through NAMI’s research that, every year, 1 in 25 adults in the U.S will experience a mental illness that “substantially interfere[s] or limits one or more major life activities”, such as their work. CAMH research found 20% of Canadians will experience a … Read more...