Directly from the Source: How to Best Transform EHS Today’s Return to Work Survey Results into Action Plans

There’s something to be said about hearing something directly from the source. No presumptions, no exaggeration—just pure, unadulterated facts. It’s for that very reason that surveys and focus groups play such a critical role in business in general and in EHS in particular. While this applies to most initiatives, this is especially true for return to work (RTW) programs, as they were developed quickly in response to the sudden outbreak of COVID-19.

For these programs, capturing employee feedback, particularly in the early stages post implementation, is critical. This is not only to improve processes where areas of improvement have been identified but also to course-correct where action plans are not working. Essentially, creating closed-loop processes will differentiate evolving RTW ones from their static counterparts.

To explore this further, we will look at the latest survey-focused report published by EHS today, Safety Professionals Prepare for the Post-Pandemic Workplace.


EHS Today’s Safety
Read more...

Think Twice Before You Dismiss that Near-Miss

They happen every day. They happen 300 times more frequently than incidents and they contain important information to prevent incidents. Yes, I am talking about near-misses. OSHA describes a near-miss as “an incident where no property was damaged and no personal injury sustained, but where given a slight shift in time or position, damage and/or injury could have occurred.” Basically, near-misses are any occurrence where the events did not result in injury but could have. This is why near-misses are often referred to as close-calls.

Near-Miss Reporting

Reporting and investigating incidents, injuries and any kind of damage is not only a vital step to managing safety, but for most organizations today it is required. Despite this, many organizations have yet to expand their reporting processes to include near-misses. This is a serious mistake. After all, near-misses are the precursor to the main event. By failing to report, analyze and understand … Read more...