Elements of Leadership and the EHS Professional – Part Two

In Part One, we looked at the role of a EHS professional and some key attributes I believe every EHS professional needs to possess to have sustainable success in their organization and career. In Part Two, let’s look at a few more.

The Affiliative Leader is another attribute closely related to supportive leadership. It is the ability of the EHS professional to bring together groups of people when team building is important. While I do not believe this style can be used alone, there is plenty of evidence to support that our ability to leverage collaboration and teamwork is a pivotal leadership attribute to a well-balanced and sustainable EHS process. It’s the ability to take a management dependent or independent workforce to one of interdependence; where employees and leaders work together to both implement and promote a “values” based system that is built on the premise that ‘no-one gets … Read more...

Elements of Leadership and the EHS Professional – Part One

In an article published in the Harvard Business Review titled, “Managers and Leaders: Are They Different?”, the author explores the difference between “leadership” and “management.” “It takes neither genius nor heroism to be a manager,” he wrote, “but rather persistence, tough-mindedness, hard work, intelligence, analytical ability and perhaps most important, tolerance and goodwill.” Granted, one would be hard pressed to deny that these are not admirable qualities, but it is doubtful that these qualities would ever deliver sustainable EHS performance in a complex and dynamic organization.

Over the past 25 years of my career, I’ve spent most of my time working in local and corporate level positions striving to improve EHS process and performance. Over the years, I discovered that organizations best optimize their efforts when they provide strong well-balanced leadership. Strong and well-balanced meaning that it does not lie strictly on a regulatory focus, but considers employee capability and … Read more...

Measuring Safety, part 1 – The Relevance of Outcomes

The other day I received another self-praising message in my news-feed, one of Norway’s major construction contractors was celebrating their one year anniversary since their last lost time injury incident, making their LTIF now “Zero”.

While reading James Reason’s latest book, “Organisational Accidents Revisited” I noticed the quote: “The road to Hell is paved with falling LTI frequency rates”,  illustrated by major cases like DWH and Texas City.

I believe it is good when no one has been injured as a consequence of their work. At the same time, this has again turned my attention to something which has been keeping me busy for many years;

why are people so focused on outcomes, when they mean so little in terms of improvement, especially in safety?

 Obsessed About Outcomes

When an incident or accident happens, it’s generally the consequences that attract great attention. From a humanitarian and … Read more...

Head of Intelex recognized by peer CEO group for leadership

We Intelexians couldn’t be more proud of our President and CEO Mark Jaine.

AceTech Ontario, a group of more than 50 CEOs in the technology sector, handed Mark a unique leadership award during its annual retreat in Ontario’s Blue Mountains last week. Four CEOs in the organization were recognized for their leadership and accomplishments. Mark was singled out for an aggressive and highly successful sales and marketing strategy.

“It is truly humbling to receive this unique award from a network of peers that I both respect and admire,” Mark said in response to receiving the award. “I have learned so much through my participation with AceTech Ontario over the years, so it is a great honour to be recognized in this way.”

Head over to our press room for more information about this significant accomplishment.

Congratulations, Mark! SmileRead more...