Data Does not Speak for Itself: You Have to Speak for It

Letting the data speak for itself can result in unrecognizable insights for many in your organization. Data needs to be interpreted to make sense.

The data will speak for itself. This is a phrase that is commonly thrown around in data analytics circles.

Often the people who say the data will speak for itself are the ones who are closest to the data, and for them, this might be true. EHS analysts, business analysts and other disciplines that focus on data collection, cleaning, preparation and analysis are closest to the data.

However, for employees of departments whose focus is not data analysis, the data can look like it is speaking Italian instead of English. This means that “letting the data speak for itself” can result in unrecognizable insights for many in your organization.

The practice of environmental, health and safety (EHS) is experiencing growing pains when it comes to analysis … Read more...

Sharing Expert Knowledge: A Look at Some of our 2020 Webinars

2020 Intelex Webinars

The coronavirus pandemic has made 2020 a year of crisis, financial devastation, and human tragedy. At the same time, it’s been the catalyst for unprecedented introspection and analysis about the way our world works and what we need to do better to help the people that need it most.

  1. A Look Ahead at 2021—More of the Same for EHS or a Whole New Ballgame?
    • Attorneys Michael Taylor and Adam Roseman from the law firm of Greenberg Traurig look back at 2020 to see what EHS will look like in 2021.
  2. How Quality Professionals Should Gather High-Quality Data to Inform Truly Effective Decision Making via Neuroscience
    • Dr. Gleb Tsipursky discusses how to avoid cognitive biases and blindspots that can give us bad information and result in poor decision making.Moving from Data Collection to Data Decisions—Supporting Business Continuity During a Crisis
  3. Moving from Data Collection to Data Decisions—Supporting Business Continuity During a
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6 Feet Apart: How Our Lives and Workplaces Have Changed Post-COVID

To reduce the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, it is important for all employers to address the specific exposure risks, sources of exposure, routes of transmission, and other unique characteristics of COVID-19.

For the first time since March 14, I ate a meal in a restaurant. Well, not in a restaurant; on a restaurant patio.

While the restaurant looks the same from the outside and the brunch food is familiarly delicious – brioche French toast with local blueberries, ricotta custard and Ohio maple syrup – everything else is different. Masks are required for all employees and customers, who could take them off once seated. Customers are reminded not to “congregate” around other tables or the bar area to observe proper social distancing. Tables are spaced 6-8 feet apart. Menus are paper and are thrown away after use. Tables are disinfected as soon as diners got up to leave.

While I … Read more...

Taking Construction Safety Best Practices to New Heights Using Technology

Tracking leading and lagging indicators and using that data to make decisions about workplace safety efforts can help reduce injuries and illnesses and in some cases, can contribute to productivity gains.

Join us for a May 12 webinar, “Taking Construction Safety Best Practices to New Heights Using Technology,” explores the technology-driven journey of Moss Construction. Moss reduced injuries and illnesses while maintaining an impressive TRIR of 0.44 at a LTIR of 0.15. At the same time, the company experienced a 30 to 40 percent year-over-year growth with approximately $2 billion in annual revenue.

The webinar is hosted by Construction Executive and features Scott Gerard, Vice President, Environmental, Health & Safety for Moss Construction, and Scott Gaddis, Practice Lead and VP of Health and Safety for Intelex. They will discuss how the company utilizes Intelex technology to successfully manage safety performance, reducing injuries and related costs. Gerard also will share some … Read more...

How the Data Revolution is Changing the Safety Professional’s Role

The safety professional’s goal in an organization has not changed significantly since its inception. The mission of the safety professional is to safeguard workers and contribute to the goals of the organization by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating, and controlling workplace hazards. What has changed is the way we collect data and the data we collect. 

Organizations always have tracked data, looking for trends. Your organization may be most interested in tracking market and economic trends, but you probably focus on data related to leading and lagging indicators, such as near misses, audit reports, training records, and injuries and illnesses. Until very recently, tracking leading and lagging indicators of safety performance has been a matter of paper documents that either were filed in a cabinet or entered into a spreadsheet or rudimentary software program. The process of collecting the information was time-consuming, and the amount of information that could be collected was limited by available resources, namely, how much “spare” … Read more...

Collecting Data from the Field? Follow this Formula for Success!

A drill operator at an oil rig is looking tired and “out of it.” He’s yawning, his movements are slow, and he doesn’t appear to be paying much attention to detail.

Immediately, the supervisor relieves the drill operator of his duties and reassigns the task. He quickly enters the work observation in his iPad. His device has an offline mode that will sync up with his safety management system as soon as he has internet access again.

Back at the office, the safety manager’s dashboard updates in real time.

Sounds like a pipe dream? The technology exists now – the only barrier is getting end users to adopt it. The key to adoption is simplicity.

“If you want people to use it, you have to make it simple. As simple as possible,” a senior oil and gas safety VP said to me recently. With over 30 years in the industry, … Read more...