Faster, Smarter, Accurate EHS Compliance Arrives with ehsAI and Intelex

Let’s explore how a collection of smart tools, algorithms and the most advanced EHSQ platform in the world combine to solve important problems in an epically reduced timeframe

If you have attended or followed topics presented at analyst or industry forums, in or adjacent to, EHS over the last few years, you’ll know that both the analysts and vendor community have invested much time in framing how digital transformation drives the ‘4’ in 4.0. There’s a 4.0 for everything at the moment and Intelex is committed to strategies and is executing on actions that deliver results in an EHSQ 4.0 world.

We have seen presentation after webinar after presentation about the EHS trends we all should pay attention to. Of these trends, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) probably are the two most exciting and pervasive. They also are described as perhaps the most challenging, hence … Read more...

How ISO 45001:2018 Ensures Continuous Improvement in Your EHS Management System

ISO 45001:2018 is the international standard for occupational health and safety management systems. It was created to provide guidance in eliminating the thousands of work-related injuries, illnesses, and fatalities that happen every day around the world. For industries in which workers are engaged in activities that carry the risk of injury or death, ISO 45001:2018 is one of the most important certification standards an organization can achieve. In 2018, ISO 45001 was updated to reflect the high-level structure (HLS) defined in Annex SL to bring it into line with other standards for management systems such as ISO 9001:2015 for quality management systems and ISO 14001:2015 for environmental management systems. This alignment makes it easier for organizations to certify to multiple standards to meet the requirements for their different management systems. 

Yet without adequate support and engagement from the entire workforce, including leadership, your management system can’t grow and improve to provide the value your business needs. … Read more...

Six Tips for Managing your Regulatory Content

Over the last century, globalization has driven a 4000% increase in international trade and prompted a rapid rise in the number of multinational (MNC) and transnational (TNC) corporations operating around the world. But companies operating in multiple countries must comply with rapidly changing local environment, health and safety (EHS) regulations such as OSHA in the U.S., the “Framework Directive” in the EU and JICOSH in Japan. In 2018, Enhesa covered 4,222 EHS regulatory developments from over 40 countries and 275 jurisdictions globally, an increase of 20% from 2017.

The short- and long-term costs (shut-downs, fines, litigation and tarnished brand) of non-compliance can be staggering. A recent Enhesa benchmarking survey of corporate EHS Executives found that:

  • 74 percent had incurred an enforcement action in the last five years
  • Two-thirds of the respondents had been issued regulatory fines up to $100k due to recent non-compliance. An additional 10 percent experienced fines in
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Four Considerations to Achieve Health and Safety Compliance

Over a series of three blogs we are going to examine how to achieve health and safety process excellence. There are three main objectives that EHS professionals must fulfill to achieve their health and safety goals: maintain compliance, anticipate and manage hazards, and improve safety culture.

Safety Compliance

This first blog is going to focus on the building blocks that create the foundation for maintaining safety compliance and engaging in continuous improvement. Some keys to achieving this objective are automating reports and document control to ensure consistency between departments and locations, tracking employee training as well as audits and corrective actions and automating compliance with various federal, state or province or local regulations.

Creating the Right Solution

Technology can assist your organization in maintaining all those records and help you ensure that your facility complies with local regulations. In fact, technology has become an essential tool in achieving process excellence … Read more...

Ask Enhesa Vol. 18 Intelex Special draft

Featuring contributions from Tjeerd Hendel-Blackford and Shannon Summers Enhesa; Kristen Duda and Jessica Sarnowski, Intelex  

Why do Intelex and Enhesa partner with each other? 

Enhesa and Intelex started working together back in 2013 as there were clear mutual benefits of partnering. On the one hand, Intelex is a market leading EHSQ software platform and enables clients to manage their EHS program in one central platform, including compliance with EHS laws. On the other hand, Enhesa is the global market leader in providing analysis of global EHS laws and regulations, packaged as “regulatory content.” This means there is no overlap in what both companies provide, but a lot of mutual benefits in working together to serve our mutual clients’ end goals – which is ultimately to look after the safety of their employees and the natural environment in which they operate. 

Another way to look at it is by taking the analogy of a CD or Cassette player (remember those?). In this example, Intelex … Read more...

Peloton Thinking May Drive EHSQ Teams to the Finish Line of Compliance

The Tour de France and EHS management would, at first glance, seem to have little in common.

When I was first introduced to the concept of the “peloton,” a word that describes the clustered formation of cyclists in a road race, I was a bit surprised. This is a tactic used by cyclists to save energy and work as a team to win a race. But it raised a fundamental question in my mind: why would a competitor forego individual success in a race?

A peloton moves along as a bunched-up group with each rider continually making slight adjustments in response to the things that adjacent riders do, particularly the leader of the pack. Road racing is very much a team sport, so with the peloton, riders individually apply tactics to achieve success for the team. Team members might ride in a formation that shields their principal rider from … Read more...

Finding the Best EHS Solution for Your Business: 10 Questions for Buying EHS Compliance Software

Many organizations are discovering that EHS regulations are becoming increasingly complex. Businesses that operate in a global environment must contend with regulations that are unique to every jurisdiction. The regulations for each jurisdiction can be extremely complex, and when those requirements are added to the requirements for all the other jurisdictions in which the business operates, EHS compliance can become overwhelming and almost impossible to manage.

Environmental compliance solutions can be the solution to navigating this overwhelming complexity. They can help organizations keep track of the regulations in different jurisdictions, organize their data, and make fact-based decisions that fulfill their compliance obligations without burning through both human and financial resources.

But once an organization has decided to implement an environmental compliance solution, where should they start? What are some of the questions they should ask? In a new webinar, Intelex Global Compliance Content Lead Jessica Sarnowski identifies 10 questions every Read more...

The consequences of non-compliance

In the U.S., companies that violate Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations can end up paying a variety of prices, some that are definite and simple to calculate, and others that are less quantifiable, but real nevertheless. 

Within the former category, OSHA defines six types of violations:  

  • De Minimis – The least serious kind of violation, this is a technical one that has no direct impact on health or safety. OSHA does not issue citations or fines for such infractions.  
  • Other-than-Serious – A violation for something that is related to health or safety but would not result in serious injury or death. An employer not posting required safety documentation in a work area is an example. Fines of up to $12,934 per violation are possible. 
  • Serious – Issued when an employer that has knowledge of an existing hazard that could impact employees’ health or safety yet does nothing to
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Compliance — What’s Involved?

In the U.S., the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) stipulates that employers must “provide a workplace free from serious recognized hazards and comply with standards, rules and regulations issued under the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act.”

Interestingly, the OSH Act itself contains no regulations on Occupational Health and Safety. OSHA, however, has promulgated countless regulations under the authority granted to it by the Act. These regulations cover virtually every conceivable health or safety hazard in the workplace.

Among their many requirements under the OSH Act, employers must:

  • examine their workplace conditions to make sure they conform to the standards that apply to them
  • make sure employees have and use safe tools and equipment and properly maintain this equipment
  • establish or update operating procedures and communicate them so that employees follow safety and health requirements
  • keep records of work-related injuries and illnesses. Employers with 10 or fewer employees and
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H&S Compliance Basics: Key Regulatory Bodies, by Region

In the U.S., the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970 stipulates what employers are responsible for in the area of H&S. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), part of the U.S. Ministry of Labor, was created in 1971 to enforce the Act and amend it when necessary.

Individual U.S. states are encouraged, but not required, to establish their own safety and health administrations. In 2018, 26 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands had OSHA-approved plans. Many state plans adopt standards identical to OSHA. OSHA approves and monitors all state plans and provides up to 50 percent of the funding for each program. State-run safety and health programs must be at least as effective (ALAE) as the federal OSHA program. Twenty-two of these programs cover both private and state and local government workers. OSHA provides coverage to certain workers specifically excluded from a state plan, such … Read more...