How ISO 9001:2015 Can Lead You to Quality Excellence

Let’s be honest. No matter how important ISO 9001 certification is, few people sit around and read ISO documents for fun. True, everything you need to know to get your organization certified to the most popular standard in the world is in there, but it’s a dense 40-page read, and it’s easy to get lost in the intricacy of the requirements for certification.

Yet the value of certifying to ISO 9001:2015 is undeniable. More than 1 million organizations have certified to ISO 9001:2008 and realized the benefits of improved Quality Management, reduced operational waste, and increased customer satisfaction. Certifying to ISO 9001:2015 will give you all that and more. It can also help your organization meet regulatory requirements and create new opportunities as many clients in the public sector and automotive industries begin to require it from their suppliers and partners.

The new Intelex Insight Report on ISO 9001:2015 can … Read more...

Technology OSHA Citations You Need to Know

In the world of health and safety, there are certainly some things that rarely or ever change. Case in point – some of the routine citations issued against various standards non-compliances by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Each year, OSHA tallies up the citations it has issued and publishes a list of the 10 most cited standards. There are a half-dozen that almost always make that list, and include:

  • Falls are among the leading causes of serious injury and death in the workplace, and OSHA is serious about preventing them. Four of the agency’s 10 most cited standards in 2017 were related to fall prevention, including the rules for ladder safety and scaffolds.
  • Hazard communication are an OSHA’s perennial top-10 citations. Without the labeling and training required by the hazard communication standard (29 CFR 1910.1200), workers might not realize that the chemicals they work with every day
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Help Your Company Learn What is Quality Management and Why Does It Matter?

If you’re responsible for and specialize in the management of Quality within your organization then you understand and appreciate the value of it. Unfortunately, most others may not.

Like all business processes, it takes the efforts and commitment of business executives and every employee to make Quality Management most effective and successful. And that often means Quality Management professionals need to step in and step up to be the educators and evangelists.

Organizations seeking to be the best they can be must drive the effort around the importance and essential nature of Quality Management as the set of principles that helps them continuously improve processes to reduce waste and inefficiencies while increasing revenue, consistency, and customer satisfaction. Organizational success in high quality means everyone – from business leadership on down – needs to play their part in supporting the principles and tools of Quality Management to gain insight into every … Read more...

Risking EHS non-compliance may have you paying a heavy price

There’s a price to be paid by organizations that don’t comply with Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) laws and regulations. The big question is: how much?

It’s not just the obvious things like fines and financial penalties imposed by regulators. That’s the easier-to-calculate cost. There are the indirect cost implications, such as loss of production or loss of share price. And the non-quantifiable costs, such as damage to brand reputation.

But, how much does compliance with EHS laws and regulations specifically cost your organization annually and globally? For most companies who pro-actively manage EHS, an answer is likely readily available since there is often a defined budget and the costs element is quantifiable.

But what does the cost of compliance actually mean for your business and how can it be measured? And, is your organization confident that it is as compliant as possible?

A report, authored by Tjeerd Hendel-Blackford, head … Read more...

How a Safety Management System Can Save You Money

A software-based system for managing safety in manufacturing organizations may hold the key to unlocking efficiency, improving processes and creating safer workplaces that, at the end of the day, puts money back in the pockets of these businesses.

Experts say that Safety Management System (SMS) support the ability of manufacturing companies to help change leadership thinking and cultures in reducing the number of workplace injuries through increased awareness of, and involvement in, safety programs, and ultimately elevating the important of and commitment to safety across entire organizations.

In the U.S. a total of US$170 billion is spent by business each year on occupational injury- and illness-related costs that eat away at net earnings. The National Safety Council reports that a dollar invested in an SMS – and the subsequent potential improvements that can be achieved in overall safety management – returns anywhere from between $2 and $6. These savings come … Read more...

The Value of an Integrated Approach to EHSQ Management

We need to take a different approach to managing Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality (EHSQ) efforts. It involves doing away with the E – HS – Q siloed, fragmented approach where departments have little or no communication or collaboration amongst each other. Instead, take an approach that is based on all departments sharing data and working with each other in a highly cohesive and efficient way that saves time, money and effort.

The concept is known as an Integrated Environmental, Health and Safety, and Quality (EHSQ) management system.

In many companies, department leaders share many of the same concerns: fragmented technology, poor metrics, cultural challenges, inconsistent support of upper management, and siloed processes. Wouldn’t it make sense to manage these similar challenges – and look for shared opportunities – under one framework?

According to a recent report from LNS Research, organizations that adopt an integrated EHSQ management system achieve … Read more...

Mitigating Risk in Global Food Sourcing Begins with Integrated Supplier Management

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Increasing public concern for food quality and global sourcing of food products is moving the entire food and beverage industry towards creating better ways and means of ensuring the safety of what we eat.

It’s also driving the creation of an interconnected global system for the production and distribution of food. During the last decade, many public and private standards for food safety and quality have been developed around the world and today there are more worldwide standards than ever before. The trend is clear – food safety is top of mind concern on a global scale.

With the finalization of Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) and compliance Preventive Controls rules for large companies already announced, the increased need for integrated supply chain management has become paramount.

What are the most important trends impacting food and beverage companies today?

Source: LNS Research Food and Beverage industry survey data

Still, it’s … Read more...

OSHA’s New Rule a Recordkeeping Mountain for Employers to Climb

DOWNLOAD NOW ButtonAn already vast ocean of incident and illness electronic recordkeeping for American business has become a whole lot deeper and wider, as a result of OSHA’s “new rule” that came into effect this year.

In 2017, more organizations must gather more data and provide more reporting of accident and illness incidents to the U.S. Department of Labor agency.  The so-called “new rule” from OSHA will turn a molehill into a mountain as the number of those employers who will be expected to report this data is set to quadruple. Currently about 35,000 large employers submit data annually to OSHA and that number is expected to jump to 130,000. Approximately 150,000 smaller employers who currently submit summary data now includes 500,000 organizations.

Other significant requirements of the new rule include:

  • Directing employers to conduct refresher training on recordkeeping requirements.
  • The auditing of injury and illness recordkeeping forms.
  • Providing training on new
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The 10 Most Dangerous Jobs, NAOSH Week, MSHA Releases Q1 Fatality Data, and more on EHS This Week!

On this week’s edition of EHS This Week we’ve got the week’s top stories in environment, health and safety news:

  • Gartner releases first EH&S Magic Quadrant
  • 2014 NAOSH Week emphasizes making safety a habit
  • Fishing tops the list of the 10 most dangerous jobs
  • MSHA’s 2014 Q1 fatality data released
  • Site managers may be undermining your safety strategy
  • Workplace Injuries in New York cost the economy

Remember to write us with your suggestions, questions and comments. Also, if you are an industry expert and ever want to take part in the program, we’d love to have you.

Until next week, enjoy the program!

EHS This Week Resources

For more information on the stories and resources mentioned in this week’s podcast, check out the links below.

  • 2014 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Environmental, Health and Safety Management Systems. Download the complimentary report here.
  • 10 Most Dangerous Jobs Infographic. View it here
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Think Twice Before You Dismiss that Near-Miss

They happen every day. They happen 300 times more frequently than incidents and they contain important information to prevent incidents. Yes, I am talking about near-misses. OSHA describes a near-miss as “an incident where no property was damaged and no personal injury sustained, but where given a slight shift in time or position, damage and/or injury could have occurred.” Basically, near-misses are any occurrence where the events did not result in injury but could have. This is why near-misses are often referred to as close-calls.

Near-Miss Reporting

Reporting and investigating incidents, injuries and any kind of damage is not only a vital step to managing safety, but for most organizations today it is required. Despite this, many organizations have yet to expand their reporting processes to include near-misses. This is a serious mistake. After all, near-misses are the precursor to the main event. By failing to report, analyze and understand … Read more...