Your Business Continuity Toolkit: A One-Stop Destination to Drive Business Agility

As the age-old adage goes, “a goal without a plan is only a wish.” Interestingly, that saying is just as relevant and powerful today as it has been in the past.

As businesses continue to grapple with the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, leaders are faced with developing long-term strategies, all while addressing immediate needs and challenges. This is where the business continuity model and framework come in.

For this very reason, it’s become even more critical to provide decision-makers with key industry-specific, actionable recommendations through processes and toolkits – to save them time and give them the bandwidth needed to tackle pressing issues that require their attention.

The Definition of Business Continuity


As defined by the International Labour Organization (ILO), business continuity management is “a management process that identifies potential threats and provides a framework for building resilience and capability for an effective response which safeguards the interests of … Read more...

6 Feet Apart: How Our Lives and Workplaces Have Changed Post-COVID

To reduce the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak, it is important for all employers to address the specific exposure risks, sources of exposure, routes of transmission, and other unique characteristics of COVID-19.

For the first time since March 14, I ate a meal in a restaurant. Well, not in a restaurant; on a restaurant patio.

While the restaurant looks the same from the outside and the brunch food is familiarly delicious – brioche French toast with local blueberries, ricotta custard and Ohio maple syrup – everything else is different. Masks are required for all employees and customers, who could take them off once seated. Customers are reminded not to “congregate” around other tables or the bar area. Tables are spaced 6-8 feet apart. Menus are paper and are thrown away after use. Tables are disinfected as soon as diners got up to leave.

While I appreciate the new protocols the … Read more...

Ready to Return: Our Return-To-Work Tools Can Help You Safely and Successfully Reopen Your Workplace

Cleaning, disinfecting, decontamination, and ventilation of the work area is an important step in returning employees safely to the workplace.

As a result of COVID-19, it is no longer business as usual. As businesses ramp back up, employers need a plan to reopen keeping safety and productivity top of mind.

Your COVID-19 Preparedness Plan should establish the policies, practices and conditions necessary to meet the regulatory requirements where you do business.

What Your RTW Plan Should Address

The plan should include and describe how your business will implement, at a minimum, the following:

  • Infection prevention measures;
  • Prompt identification and isolation of sick workers;
  • Engineering and administrative controls for social distancing;
  • Cleaning, disinfecting, decontamination, and ventilation of the work area;
  • Communications and training for managers and workers necessary to implement the plan; and
  • Provision of management and supervision necessary to ensure effective ongoing implementation of the plan.

If you are a … Read more...

Not ‘Business as Usual’: Intelex Joins the NSC SAFER Task Force to Provide Guidance for the Post-Pandemic Workplace

Intelex is joining a task force representing over 50 organizations as part of the NSC Safe Actions for Employee Return to Work (SAFER) initiative, which will issue recommendations and guidance about post-pandemic return-to-work.

After months of economic and industrial disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, countries around the world are either beginning to bring workers back to the physical workplace or are in the planning process. Asia and some countries in Europe have reopened factories and eased restrictions on travel, and other countries are looking to follow suit as new infection rate curves flatten.   

As organizations navigate the actual and potential return-to-work scenarios resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Safety Council (NSC) has launched an initiative to help organizations create safe workplaces. The NSC Safe Actions for Employee Return to Work (SAFER) initiative will leverage a newly formed task force of national safety and health leaders from Fortune 500 companies, industry associations, and government and medical organizations. Lending their … Read more...

Intelex Customer Success: Breaking New Ground and Finding Better Business Value

Customer Success (CS) is the most direct interaction we have with our customers, which makes the CS team a crucial contributor to providing real business and customer value.

Customer Success (CS) is a vital part of the relationship Intelex has with its customers. The goal of CS is to provide customers with the knowledge they need to be successful during initial implementation and beyond.

Customer Success manages the business relationship with the customer, prevents churn, and identifies opportunities for growth during the contract lifecycle. Therefore, CS is the most direct interaction we have with our customers, which makes the CS team a crucial contributor to providing real business and customer value.

Yet, with Customer Success being a relatively new job title that has only been around for a few years, the concept of “best practices” is still developing. This can make it difficult to make sure all the members of … Read more...

Is COVID-19 a Workplace Illness? OSHA Attempts to Clarify Recordkeeping

OSHA hopes its latest enforcement guidance helps employers focus their response efforts on implementing good hygiene practices in their workplaces and otherwise mitigating COVID-19’s effects.

OSHA has issued interim guidance for enforcing its recordkeeping requirements (29 CFR Part 1904) as they relate to recording cases of COVID-19.

Under OSHA’s recordkeeping requirements, COVID-19 is considered a recordable illness, and employers are responsible for reporting cases of COVID-19 as workplace injuries and illnesses if the case:

  • Is confirmed as a COVID-19 illness;
  • Is work-related as defined by 29 CFR 1904.5; and
  • Involves one or more of the general recording criteria in 29 CFR 1904.7, such as medical treatment beyond first aid or days away from work.

In areas where there is ongoing community transmission, many employers may have difficulty making determinations about whether workers who contracted COVID-19 did so due to exposures at work, making accurate injury and illness reporting … Read more...

Communicating in Crisis: Preparing the Public Information Officer

In Part Six of the series “Communicating in Crisis,” a checklist for the EHS professional provides insight into the information you might  be asked to provide in a crisis.

Depending on the magnitude of the crisis, the role of the EHS practitioner in many cases is not only to gather and report information but to anticipate what information will be asked Shot of two warehouse workers standing on stairs using a digital tablet and looking at paperwork.

The EHS practitioner likely will lead or be a big part of gathering data and producing information that will be used for communications with the public, media sources and officials affected by the crisis. In most organizations, there is a role defined as public information officer (PIO), and while various titles may be used organizationally, it is this person who serves as the public face for the organization.

The Role of the PIO

Read more...

Communicating in Crisis: Emergency Response Planning, Preparation and Training

In Part Five of the series “Communicating in Crisis,” Scott Gaddis explains why you should not leave crisis planning to chance.

It’s not if but when a crisis event occurs at your facility, so make sure you have planned for it and employees are trained in emergency response.

How an organization handles emergency response during a crisis – and the communications of such events – cannot be left to chance. Planning, preparation and especially, training contribute to successfully managing emergency response. So, handle these in a way that benefits you as a practitioner and the organization you represent.  

Personally, and with few exceptions, I always was totally surprised when a crisis event happened. Some were small events, others quite large and complex, but most were very unexpected. Don’t think that a crisis event might happen, because at some point, such an event will occur. Prepare employees by providing emergency … Read more...

Communicating in Crisis: Government Agencies

In Part Four of the series “Communicating in Crisis,” Scott Gaddis explains how important it is for EHS practitioners to know and understand regulations – local, state, and federal – that require reports to be filed following an emergency situation such as an environmental spill or employee injury.

Some emergency situations require reporting to local, regional or federal agencies, which may step in to coordinate a response.

There are no “hard and fast” rules for the EHS practitioner in reporting a crisis event to government agencies. So, know the regulations required by the specific agency that has jurisdiction over your operation.

For instance, in the United States, an environmental emergency is reportable to EPA when there’s a threat that reaches a threshold limit. Likewise, OSHA has similar protocols when fatal or specifically defined injuries occur.

Understand Reporting Requirements

It is vital that you understand the reporting requirements for all government … Read more...

Communicating in Crisis: Employees

In Part Three of the series “Communicating in Crisis,” Scott Gaddis explains how important it is for EHS practitioners to be as honest and transparent as possible when communicating to employees about a crisis situation.

Unless employees are front row center as a crisis unfolds, it’s a safe bet that only versions of the truth are being shared with them by coworkers.

First and foremost, it is paramount during a crisis that the EHS practitioner and the management team be as upfront and honest as possible with employees. This does not mean the organization is admitting fault or taking the blame, but is communicating what is known as truth at the time the crisis is occurring. Unless employees were front row center as the crisis unfolded, it’s a safe bet that only versions of the truth are being shared with various fabrications of the facts crafting a new storyline as … Read more...