The 2019 Top 10: The Hottest EHSQ Reports You Might Have Missed

The holidays are a time to catch up with family and friends, to relax and refresh, celebrate our blessings, eat good food, and enjoy some quiet time. It’s also a great time to catch up on some of the most popular EHSQ reports that your peers have read this year. 

At Intelex, we strive to provide you with the knowledge and information you need to perform your job more efficiently and effectively, helping you to understand and utilize EHSQ management systems and applications that can make your work life easier and place you in a strategic position within your organization. 

To that end, here is our holiday gift to you: A list of the 10 most popular Intelex Insight Reports and White Papers released in 2019. 

1. IIoT and the Continuing Evolution of Safety Management Systems 

As we enter a new decade, all of the knowledge we’ve gathered about safety management systems can be collected, stored, evaluated, sliced, diced, and used to drive EHSQ performance using the tools found in Industry 4.0. Observations, audits, and leading indicators such as training and employee engagement, trending patterns of injury and illness rates, tracking near misses, and more can be delivered through technology, including cloud computing, predictive analytics, wearables, sensors, and machine learning.  
 
In this report, you will learn how, through the use of the many tools provided as part of IIoT, you will have more time available to create EHSQ strategies that will have a meaningful impact on safety, health, the environment, quality, and production.  

2. Is Your Food At Risk? 

Today’s international food supply chain is more complex than ever before. With that complexity comes greater vulnerability to crime and fraud, as demonstrated by such infamous incidents as the adulteration of infant formula with melamine in China in 2008 and the substitution of horse meat for beef in the EU in 2013. In addition to this, governments and health agencies around the world now consider a deliberate attack on the food supply to be a highly probable event that demands attention and preparation by governments and food producers alike. 
 
In this paper, we explain why food organizations must look beyond the traditional tools for food safety and quality. You will learn how to build integrated management systems that incorporate safety, quality, defence, organizational culture, and awareness of the motivational behaviour and psychology of the criminal perpetrator of food crime. 

3. How the Data Revolution is Changing the Safety Professional’s Role 

Improving safety performance is a team effort that is based on data that easily can be collected and analyzed to prioritize where safety management efforts can have the most impact.  When it comes to improving performance in health & safety, organizations must leverage a valuable asset - data - to improve EHS performance.   
 
Your organization may be most interested in tracking market, and economic trends, but the safety professionals at your company probably focus on data related to leading and lagging indicators, such as near misses, audit reports, training records, and injuries and illnesses. Until very recently, tracking, leading and lagging indicators of safety performance has been a matter of paper documents that either was filed in a cabinet or entered into a spreadsheet or rudimentary software program.  

4. 10 Steps to Take Your Safety Management System from Good to Great 

Connected workers = safer workers. That means integrating people, processes, and tools throughout your organization to keep your workers safe and provide maximum value to your bottom line. 
 
Scott Gaddis, Vice President and Global Practice Leader—Safety and Health at Intelex Technologies Inc., provides insights that will help you meet your EHS challenges in the checklist “10 Steps to Take Your Safety Management System from Good to Great.” 

5. Integrating Quality and Safety in Organizational Culture: A Cross-Industry Look 

Quality and safety culture are closely integrated in many industries. Nuclear energy, health care, construction, and petroleum are just a few of the industries in which complex interactions between people, processes, and tools can lead to failures that begin as small deviations but accumulate over time until they culminate in sometimes catastrophic events. Organizational culture, and the leadership that supports it, must therefore always be attuned to the requirements that foster strong and efficient human-technology interaction. 

This report examines how people continue to be vital elements of software-dominated systems, how complex systems breed complex problems that defy simple solutions, and how standards such as ISO 9001:2015 and industry-specific frameworks can guide organizations in their quest for better safety and quality cultures. 

6. Walking Working Surfaces and Pedestrian Safety 

Twenty percent of the 30,000 forklift accidents that occur each year involve a pedestrian being struck by the vehicle. Working in an environment that features environmental changes, poor illumination, congestion of equipment and people, and distractions means that slips, trips, and falls are a constant source of danger for pedestrians in the workplace. In this Whitepaper, “Walking-Working Surfaces and Pedestrian Safety,” Scott Gaddis, Vice President and Global Practice Leader, Safety and Health, provides a comprehensive look at preventing falls on walking-working surfaces. 

7. Innovation in Food Safety and Quality 
 
With a global supply chain that long-ago outpaced the ability of traditional methods to track and document traceability and authenticity, as well as a sophisticated criminal network that specializes in discovering new methods to avoid detection of its food adulteration activities, the toolkit of Industry 4.0 is set to revolutionize the way we manage food integrity. 

According to authors Nicole Radziwill is VP Global Quality & Supply Chain Practice at Intelex, and Graham Freeman, content writer and editor, the next generation of food integrity innovation will rest on the integration of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), HARPC (Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventative Controls), and FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) with technology solutions like IoT (Internet of Things), machine learning, and blockchain, as well as with scientific methods such as spectroscopy and electronic sensors.  

8. How to Leverage QMS Software to Promote a Culture of Quality 

With a global supply chain that long-ago outpaced the ability of traditional methods to track and document traceability and authenticity, as well as a sophisticated criminal network that specializes in discovering new methods to avoid detection of its food adulteration activities, the toolkit of Industry 4.0 is set to revolutionize the way we manage food integrity. 

In this report, we share how the next generation of food integrity innovation will rest on the integration of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points), HARPC (Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventative Controls), and FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis) with technology solutions like IoT (Internet of Things), machine learning, and blockchain, as well as with scientific methods such as spectroscopy and electronic sensors.  

9. Better Data means Higher Engagement 

Your people are a vital asset for your organization, and how they engage with your processes, tools, and culture is a key factor in determining your business success. Yet integrating these elements and ensuring you can measure and use all the data they produce can be a challenge.  

In the Insight Report, “Better Data Means Higher Engagement,” Scott Gaddis, Vice President, Global Practice Leader, Safety and Health, shows you how to make sure your business has a fully integrated and engaged culture of safety. The report shares the value of various engagement strategies such as HOP and behavior-based safety, as well as the importance not just collecting data, but also collecting and analyzing the RIGHT data to steer your EHS strategy. In addition, the report provides insights into how to use data to determine the level of engagement your employees have in your safety culture. 

10. The Deepwater Horizon: Learnings from a Large-Scale Disaster 

The Deepwater Horizon disaster is one that has been analyzed and examined by safety professionals since it took place in 2010, and the powerful images of the massive rig engulfed in flames before sinking beneath the waves are etched indelibly into the popular memory. 

Authors Scott Gaddis, Vice President, Global Practice Leader, Safety and Health, and Graham Freeman, a technical writer and researcher, call the disaster “a searing indictment of the organizational failures that led to it.” While dramatic disasters such as this might give the impression of having easily identifiable root causes, the truth is that the Deepwater Horizon disaster was the result of a long-term aggregation of errors, ignorance, and risk that infected the organizational culture at every level. 

The lessons from the disaster are ones that every organization can learn. You don’t have to be an international petroleum company to get valuable insight into the importance of organizational culture and the impact of neglecting safety and risk.

This entry was posted in EHSQ and tagged , , , by Sandy Smith. Bookmark the permalink.

About Sandy Smith

Sandy Smith is the Global EHSQ Content Lead for Intelex Technologies. Formerly the Content Director for EHS Today, she has been writing about occupational safety and health and environmental issues since 1990. Her work as a journalist and editor has been recognized with national and international awards. She has been interviewed about occupational safety and health for national business publications, documentaries and television programs; has served as a panelist on roundtables; and has provided the keynote address for occupational safety and health conferences.

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